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MSR 2018
Sun 27 May - Sun 3 June 2018 Gothenburg, Sweden
co-located with ICSE 2018

The Mining Software Repositories (MSR) field analyzes the rich data available in software repositories to uncover interesting and actionable information about software systems and projects. The goal of this two-day conference is to advance the science and practice of MSR. The 15th International Conference on Mining Software Repositories is sponsored will be co-located with ICSE 2018 in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Research Papers: Call for Papers

View track page for all details

Research papers can be short papers (4 pages plus 1 additional page for references) and full papers (10 pages plus 2 additional pages for references). Short research papers should discuss controversial issues in the field, or describe interesting or thought provoking ideas that are not yet fully developed. Accepted short papers will present their ideas in a short lightning talk. Full research papers are expected to describe new research results, and have a higher degree of technical rigor than short papers.

Practice Experiences

MSR encourages the submission of research papers on practice experiences. They should report experiences of applying mining repository algorithms in an industry/open source organization context. They aim at reporting positive or negative experiences of applying known algorithms, but adapting existing algorithms or proposing new algorithms for practical use would be plus.

Reusable Tools

MSR wants to promote and recognize the creation and use of tools that are designed and built not only for a specific research project, but for the MSR community as a whole. Those tools may let researchers focus on specific aspects of research, let their work be more reproducible, lower the barriers to reuse previous research efforts. Therefore, MSR encourages the submission of papers about these tools. These papers can be descriptions of tools built by the authors, that can be used by other researchers, and/or descriptions of use of tools built by others to obtain some specific research results in the area of mining software repositories.

The public availability of the tool and its internal details, its usefulness for other researchers, the measures taken to simplify its installation and use, and the availability of documentation about it should be clearly discussed in the paper. Both long papers, for complete descriptions of mature tools and/or use cases, and short papers, for summaries of promising use cases and tools, will be accepted. The papers will be reviewed both on their academic merits, and on the specific usefulness of the tools, and the experiences described, for the whole MSR community.

Submission and Review of Research Papers

All research papers, including those describing practical experiences or tools, will face the same level of review and scrutiny. To take their peculiarities into account, if you consider a paper qualifies as practice or tool paper, specify that using the corresponding option when submitting.

Important Dates

Abstract Due to be announced
Papers Due to be announced
Author Notification to be announced
Camera Ready to be announced

Organization

Program Committee Chairs

Data Showcase: Call for Papers

View track page for all details

Since 2013 the MSR conference has included a Data Showcase. The purpose of the Data Showcase is to provide a forum to share and discuss the important data sets that underpin the work of the Mining Software Repositories community.

Data Showcase papers should describe data sets that are curated by their authors and made available to use by others. Ideally, these data sets should be of value to others in the community, should be preprocessed or filtered in some way, and should provide an easy-to-understand schema. Data showcase papers are expected to include:

  • a description of the data source
  • a description of the methodology used to gather it (preferably with the tool used to create/generate the data)
  • a description of the storage mechanism, including a schema if applicable,
  • a description of how the data has been used by others, ideas for what future research questions could be answered or what further improvements could be made to the data set, and any limitations and/or challenges in creating or using this data set. The data set should be made available at the time of submission of the paper for review, but will be considered confidential until publication of the paper.

Data showcase papers are not:

  • empirical studies
  • tool demos
  • based on poorly explained or untrustworthy heuristics for data collection, or
  • simply applying generic tools to generate data that is quick and easy for others to gather.

Submission

Submit your data paper (maximum 4 pages) to EasyChair. The deadline is to be announced.

Papers submitted for consideration should not have been published elsewhere and should not be under review or submitted for review elsewhere during the duration of consideration. ACM plagiarism policies and procedures shall be followed for cases of double submission.

Upon notification of acceptance, all authors of accepted papers will be asked to complete an ACM Copyright form and will receive further instructions for preparing their camera ready versions. At least one author of each paper is expected to present the results at the MSR conference as a poster or oral presentation. All accepted contributions will be published in the conference electronic proceedings.

Important Dates

Papers Due to be announced
Author Notification to be announced
Camera Ready to be announced

Organization

Program Committee Chairs

Mining Challenge: Call for Papers

View track page for all details

The International Conference on Mining Software Repositories (MSR) has hosted a mining challenge since 2006. With this challenge we call upon everyone interested to apply their tools to bring research and industry closer together by analyzing a common data set. The challenge is for researchers and practitioners to bravely use their mining tools and approaches on a dare.

This year, the challenge is on Enriched Event Streams, a public data set for empirical studies on in-IDE activities of software developers. The data set contains over 11M events–corresponding to 15K hours of working time of 81 developers–that have been collected using FeedBaG, a general-purpose interaction tracker for Visual Studio. FeedBaG captures all commands invoked in the IDE, together with additional context information, and stores them in an Enriched Event Stream that provides a holistic picture of the in-IDE development process.

Enriched Event Streams can help answer, for example, the following research questions:

  • Which IDE commands do developer use?
  • How are test cases executed?
  • Does refactoring lead to more failed tests?
  • How do developers navigate the code base?
  • What kind of changes do developer revert?

How to Participate in the Challenge

Participating in the challenge requires you to:

  1. Familiarize yourself with the caret plattform and the dataset.
  2. Access and analyze the Enriched Event Streams data set (download the newest dataset).
  3. Report your findings in a four-page document.
  4. Submit your report on or before February 5, 2018.
  5. If your report is accepted, present your results at MSR 2018!

Challenge Data

Our March 1, 2017 release contains 11M interaction events that have been uploaded by a diverse group of 81 developers (developers that contributed less than 2,500 events are already filtered out). Out of these developers, 43 come from industry, three are researchers, give are students, and six are hobby programmers. Twenty-four participants did not provide this (optional) information about their position. The data covers a total of 1,527 aggregated days and was collected over eleven month, byt not all developers participated the entire time. On average, each developer provided 136K events (median 54K) that have been collected over 10 days (media 18.9 days) and that represent 185 hours of active work (median 48 hours). In total the data set aggregates 15K hours of development work.

Enriched Event Streams provide detailed context information about code completion, test execution, and source-code evolution. The data set contains detailed data about 200K usages of the code completion, including a snapshot of the surrounding source code, as well as 3.6K test executions. An average user provided 2.5K usages of the code completion (median 640) and 44 test executions.

We provide an API for both Java and C# that allows reading the data and we created examples in both languages that help you get started. Technically, the data set stores a JSON representation of the collected events and can also be read and processed using other languages.

If you used the Enriched Event Streams data set, please cite our challenge proposal:

    @inproceedings{msr18challenge,
      title={Enriched Event Streams: A General Dataset for Empirical Studies on In-IDE Activities of Software Developers},
      author={Proksch, Sebastian and Amann, Sven and Nadi, Sarah},
      year={2018},
      booktitle={Proceedings of the 15th Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories},
      preprint={http://www.st.informatik.tu-darmstadt.de/artifacts/msr18-challenge/MSR-Challenge-Proposal.pdf}
    }

Challenge Report

The challenge report should describe the results of your work by providing an introduction to the problem you address and why it is worth studying, the version of the data set you used, the approach and tools you used, your results and their implications, and conclusions. Make sure your report highlights the contributions and the importance of your work. We appreciate submissions that make reproducing their results easy, for example by providing (possibly external) replication instructions and open-sourcing additionally created tools.

Challenge reports must be at most 4 pages long and must conform at time of submission to the MSR 2018 Format and Submission Guidelines. Similar to the main track, the Challenge reports will undergo a light-weight double-blind review process. Therefore, the submitted paper must not reveal the authors’ identities. In particular, the names, organizations, and number of authors must not be present, and a reasonable effort should be made to blind externally available material. The identifying information may be re-added, in case of acceptance, in the camera-ready paper.

Submission

Submit your challenge report (maximum 4 pages) to EasyChair on or before February 5, 2018. Please submit your challenge reports to the “TravisTorrent Mining Challenge of the 14th International Conference on Mining Software Repositories”. Author notification and camera-ready dates are March 8th and March 17th, respectively.

Papers submitted for consideration should not have been published elsewhere and should not be under review or submitted for review elsewhere during the duration of consideration. ACM plagiarism policies and procedures shall be followed for cases of double submission.

Similar to the main track, the Challenge reports will undergo a double-blind review process. Therefore, the submitted paper must not reveal the authors’ identities. In particular, the names, organizations, and number of authors must not be present, and a reasonable effort should be made to blind externally available material. The identifying information can, of course, be re-added in case of acceptance in the camera ready paper.

Upon notification of acceptance, all authors of accepted papers will be asked to complete an ACM Copyright form and will receive further instructions for preparing their camera ready versions. At least one author of each paper is expected to present the results at the MSR 2018 conference. All accepted contributions will be published in the conference electronic proceedings.

Important Dates

Papers Due 23:59 AOE, February 5, 2018
Author Notification 23:59 AOE, March 2, 2018
Camera Ready 23:59 AOE, March 16, 2018

Organization

Program Committee Chairs